From the Vault

From the Vault: K-9 Corps in Baltimore

From the Vault: K-9 Corps in Baltimore

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On March 13, 1942, the Quartermaster Corps of the United States Army began training dogs for the newly established War Dog Program, or “K-9 corps.” Over a million dogs served on both sides during World War I.

The Baltimore City Police Department deployed their first K-9 unit on March 1, 1956. Terrance Patrick Cahill, a British police dog trainer that joined the Baltimore police department in 1959, was instrumental in establishing their program, as well as the police dog program in Washington, D.C.


Cahill’s obituary

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Retrospective: The march from Selma to Montgomery

Retrospective: The march from Selma to Montgomery

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In 1965, Martin Luther King Jr. led several attempts to march from Selma to Montgomery as part of the Selma Voting Rights Movement. The protesters encountered violent opposition from authorities and segregationists. But with federal backing, the demonstrators successfully made the four-day walk, a 50-mile stretch. That year, Congress passed the Voting Rights Act, which gave African-Americans the right to vote.

Using the style and language of journalists of the era, including a reference to blacks as “Negroes,” AP reporters captured the tension of the marches.

Fifty years after its original publication, The AP is making available excerpts from a series of stories about the marches’ progress.

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From the Vault: Domino Sugar

From the Vault: Domino Sugar

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The Baltimore sugar plant opened in 1922, and was owned at the time by the American Sugar Refining Co., or Amstar. In 1984, Amstar Corp. was sold for $428 million to investment banking firm Kohlberg, Kravis, Roberts and Co., which sold it two years later to Merrill Lynch Capital Partners Inc. Tate & Lyle bought the company in 1988.

Then, two politically connected brothers who fled the Castro regime and later built a sugar empire in Florida agreed in 2001 to purchase the Domino Sugar company for $180 million.

Hidden Maryland: Domino Sugars sign | More Hidden Maryland | From the Vault

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From the vault: Baltimore bison break free

From the vault: Baltimore bison break free

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Two loose llamas were lassoed after running amok in Sun City, Ariz., today, captivating Twitter and other social media platforms. But we’re no strangers to animals-on-the-run in Baltimore. In June 2014, a steer escaped from a Baltimore butcher, ran down North Ave. and was shot and killed by city police. In the pre-Twitter era, nine bison escaped from a Stevenson farm before being captured on a tennis court in Pikesville.

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From the vault: Mardi Gras

From the vault: Mardi Gras

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Every year since the 1800’s, revelers have flocked to New Orleans to celebrate Mardi Gras. Many historians believe that the first American Mardi Gras took place on March 3, 1699 when French explorers landed in what is now Louisiana. They held a small celebration and dubbed the spot Point du Mardi Gras.

Parades with floats, marching bands and party-goers throwing beads, wearing masks and eating King Cake are all part of the ongoing tradition of Mardi Gras. Browse through archive photos dating back to the 1940s to see how the celebration has evolved.

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From the vault: Tru-Fit fire on East Baltimore Street

From the vault: Tru-Fit fire on East Baltimore Street

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On Feb. 16, 1955, a fire ravaged the Tru-Fit Clothing Company at 507-509 E. Baltimore St. Joseph Hanley Jr., Rudolph Machovec, Francis O’Brien, Richard Melzer, William Barnes and Anthony Reinsfelder died in the fire. On the 60th anniversary of the fire, Baltimore Sun reporter Joe Burris wrote about the impact the disaster has had on the families through the years. Take a look through Sun archived images from the fire and its aftermath.

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Calvert Street post office

Calvert Street post office

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In 1931, Gerald Griffin wrote for The Sun that “in slight over a year, there will be a great bustling and stirring about in the region of Calvert and Fayette streets, as a result of which Baltimoreans again will find their post office back at its old stand, but in a new building.

Baltimoreans are quite generally familiar with the fact that the old building was not torn down because it was structurally unsafe or “worn out”; for it was constructed so solidly that its existence would have approached a theoretical “forever,” but the enormous growth in the volume of mail handled in Baltimore — from 146,604,622 pieces of ordinary mail in 1890 to 733,484,969 in 1930 — made it essential that an additional room and facilities be provided, and it was decided to erect the new building on the desirable site of the old one, a choice also made logical by the fact the Federal Government owned the ground.”

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