From the Vault

From the Vault: The Preakness Stakes

From the Vault: The Preakness Stakes

113 Photos

This Saturday will be the 140th running of the Preakness Race. Through all those years the second jewel in the Triple Crown has always been a big draw for crowds. Though the styles and fashion have changed through the years, the one constant has been the mystic of thoroughbred horse racing.

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From the vault: Remembering Baltimore’s 1968 riots

From the vault: Remembering Baltimore’s 1968 riots

41 Photos

The Baltimore riot of April 1968 was a long Palm Sunday weekend of contrasts from Saturday through Tuesday, and it wiped out much of the downtown business district.

People went to church and people looted. People were curious or scared to death. They went outside looking for adventure or to calm things down.

The skies were a sunny blue in one direction and black with smoke in another. Hundreds of city and state police officers were deployed to limit destruction in East and West Baltimore. Many merchants decried the lack of police protection for businesses. The sky was blackened with the smoke of 800 fires in 72 hours.

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From the Vault: The road to Neunburg

From the Vault: The road to Neunburg

31 Photos

Todd Richissin, The Sun’s London correspondent, reported this story by, in part, following the footsteps of a Sun correspondent who traveled with American troops during World War II, the late Lee McCardell. It was initially published in May 2005.

McCardell arrived in Neunburg with the 11th U.S. Armored Division and parts of the 3rd Army in April 1945, and filed a lengthy article about the mass funeral organized by the Americans, along with photographs of those events.

Richissin, 60 years later, interviewed many of the surviving participants.

Warning: Graphic images
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From the Vault: John Wilkes Booth, Abraham Lincoln and the assassination

From the Vault: John Wilkes Booth, Abraham Lincoln and the assassination

21 Photos

The Baltimore-Washington area played a central role in the events of April 1865. Lincoln, besides governing for more than four years out of Washington, traveled through Baltimore on his way to his first inauguration (and was the target of a foiled assassination plot at the time, many historians believe). His eventual assassin, John Wilkes Booth, was born in Bel Air. After he shot Lincoln, Booth escaped on a route that took him through Southern Maryland. And when the president’s body made its long journey back to his home in Illinois, Baltimore was the first city to hold a public funeral service.
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70th anniversary of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s death

70th anniversary of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s death

11 Photos

On April 12, 1945, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, 63, died unexpectedly of a cerebral hemorrhage. Vice President Harry S. Truman took the oath of office as President two hours and 34 minutes later.

According to a Baltimore Sun story at the time, Roosevelt’s last words were, “I have a terrific headache.”

Archival photos depict a grieving nation at the loss of the president, serving his fourth term, who died at the “little White House” in Warm Springs, Georgia. More →

From the Vault: 175th Anniversary of the Old Bay Line

From the Vault: 175th Anniversary of the Old Bay Line

26 Photos

On March 18, 1840, a bill passed the House incorporating the Baltimore Steam Packet Company, nicknamed the Old Bay Line. The steamboat line provided services on the Chesapeake Bay, primarily between Baltimore and Norfolk, Va. When it closed in 1962 after 122 years of existence, it was the last surviving overnight steamship passenger service in the United States.

Other cities serviced by the line were Washington, D.C., Old Point Comfort, and Richmond, Va. One of the Old Bay Line’s steamers, the former President Warfield, later became famous as the Exodus ship of book and movie fame, when Jewish refugees from war-torn Europe sailed aboard her in 1947 in an unsuccessful attempt to emigrate to Palestine.

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