The Baltimore Sun

Tips for taking spectacular sports pictures

Tips for taking spectacular sports pictures

12 photos

Patuxent Homestead photographers cover scores of high school sporting events during the school year. They capture hundreds of goals and runs, victories and losses, tears of joy and sadness. Photographers Jen Rynda and Brian Krista each picked six of their favorites from baseball, softball, lacrosse and track, and shared a couple of tips for taking great sports shots. (Below)

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Julio Mendoza’s dancing horses and la Garrocha

Julio Mendoza’s dancing horses and la Garrocha

11 photos, 1 video

Julio Mendoza has been riding horses since he was 3 years old, but his roots go back much further than that — he is the fourth generation in his family to train them.

Mendoza’s horses do something a little different than what you see at the Preakness Stakes. On his horse farm in Union Bridge, he teaches them dressage, or what is sometimes called “horse ballet.” In dressage, the rider and horse communicate to perform different moves and steps.

Mendoza also performs la Garrocha, which is a type of dressage that incorporates a 12-foot wooden garrocha pole. I visited he and his wife’s farm last week and took some photos and video.

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Building on the Copycat Project: Next step a publisher

Building on the Copycat Project: Next step a publisher

7 photos, 2 videos

The Darkroom interviews the creators of the Copycat Project, Rob Brulinski and Alex Wein. The duo produced a historical and pictorial documentation of the landmark Copy Cat building in a 140-page, 12-inch x 12-inch hardcover book, which features portraits of 130 residents and the avant-garde culture of creativity defining the space.
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Sailabration ships sail the internet through smart phone cameras

Sailabration ships sail the internet through smart phone cameras

26 photos

The days of art school assignments fulfilled by lugging bulky, metal-bodies cameras with manual focus and no optical zoom are behind us. Even though many of us loved every minute of it, and secretly, the smell of Kodak developer, the convenience of having an iPhone 4 in your pocket is invaluable. Better still is the gratification of sharing those photos immediately around the web.

Last year on MSNBC’s Rock Center, Annie Leibovitz said that the iPhone 4s was the “snapshot camera of today.” And while not every smartphone has an 8 megapixel resolution like the iPhone 4S, most provide an instant, and very accessible, camera for when the moment strikes. Using basic composition skills and remembering the tips from Robert Hamilton, the Sun’s director of photography, the following Sailabration photos were shot on an iPhone 4 with the Camera+ app and clarity filter between 5:30 and 10:00 p.m. on June 14, 2012.
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Celebrating “Fathers of” on Father’s Day

Celebrating “Fathers of” on Father’s Day

25 photos

From Charles Darwin to Jack LaLanne and James Brown, these “fathers” and “godfathers” are some of the most celebrated in pop culture for being innovators in their respected fields. And while your father is probably not as well known as these men, we bet he’s known for something great. Leave us a comment below describing what your father is the “Father of” to wish him a Happy Father’s Day!”
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Founder’s Day parade in London, England

Founder’s Day parade in London, England

15 photos

Founder’s Day in England celebrates the escape of the future King Charles II after defeat in the Battle of Worchester in 1651. The King evaded capture by hiding in a royal oak tree. As part of the celebration the Chelsea Pensioners, British veteran soldiers at the the Royal Chelsea Hospital, are inspected by a member of the royal family. This year the honors were carried out by Sophie, Countess of Wessex. All members of the ceremonies wear sprigs of oak leaves to commemorate the escape. The hospital was founded by King Charles II in 1682 and is home to some 300 pensioners.
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From the Sun Archives: On D-Day minus 1, the subject was fishing

From the Sun Archives: On D-Day minus 1, the subject was fishing

1 photo

Not many know the story behind the iconic photo of Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower speaking with a group of U.S. paratroopers on the eve of the D-Day invasion. Former Sun librarian Susan S. Waters told reporter Frederick N. Rasmussen details of the encounter for a story published in The Sun in 1999. Wallace C. Strobel, the young paratrooper with the blackened face and jumpmaster’s No. 23 standing in front of Eisenhower in the photo, was in fact, Waters’ father. So what did Ike say to the soldiers? The obvious guess would be that Eisenhower was rallying the paratroopers with words of victory, a great crusade and defeating the Nazis, but as Rasmussen wrote, it was actually fishing that was the topic of conversation.
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