About Kenneth K. Lam

Posts by Kenneth K. Lam:

Fly fishing: the art of tying artificial flies

Fly fishing: the art of tying artificial flies

30 Photos

The art of creating artificial flies for fishing has a long history, possibly dating back to 200 A.D., according to flyfishing.com. There were descriptions of Macedonian fishermen tying red wool and two cock feathers onto a hook and throwing it with a pole and line in the water to entice fish to bite the “fly.”

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The making of “Miracle on 34th Street,” Hampden style

The making of “Miracle on 34th Street,” Hampden style

22 Photos

The annual “Miracle on 34th Street” display draws thousands of visitors to Hampden to see the spectacular holiday lights of the 700 block of W. 34th Street. Look through images taken by Baltimore Sun photographer Kenneth K. Lam, who this year documented residents setting up their decorations ahead of the grand lighting on Nov. 30.

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Decoy artist Bryon Bodt carving out a career

Decoy artist Bryon Bodt carving out a career

18 photos

Bryon Bodt, 49, of Churchville became interested in decoys when he was a youngster and his father was an avid hunter. Later, while in college, he worked for Jim Pierce, a well-known decoy carver and founder of the Havre de Grace Decoy Festival. Today, he makes working decoys for a living.

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Celebrating Chinese New Years, the Year of the Snake

Celebrating Chinese New Years, the Year of the Snake

15 photos

The people of China celebrate the New Year on the first day of the lunar calendar. Since it is also considered to be the first day of spring, the traditional 15-days long celebration is also called Spring Festival, where schools and shops are sometimes closed for up to a week.

According to folklore, a wild and mystical beast named “Nien,” the word for year, appears at the end of the year to feast on defenseless villagers and children. It was found that the beast could be scared away by loud noises and bright lights. Therefore the New Year tradition of lighting firecrackers, hanging of bright red “Chūnlián,” and wearing of new clothing in red or gold – the colors of good fortune and prosperity – was created.

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