About Jon Sham

Posts by Jon Sham:

Robert Jackson, Baltimore Street Photographer

Robert Jackson, Baltimore Street Photographer

124 Photos, 1 Video

As a street photographer, Robert Jackson has captured people on the streets of Baltimore. When in the army, over two tours, he captured people all around the world — from Paris to Kosovo to Iraq. And even though Baltimore is much different than Kuwait, Jackson noticed similarities among those who are struggling to get by.

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Theresa Keil & Larry Cohen, Baltimore Street Photographers

Theresa Keil & Larry Cohen, Baltimore Street Photographers

99 Photos, 1 Video

Theresa Keil and Larry Cohen are the first duo featured in the Baltimore Street Photographer series, and the first couple. The pair, who form TLC Baltimore, an event photography team, spend much of their free time pursuing street photography in its purest form.

(Note: The shoot with Larry and Theresa was unique to the series in that they preferred not to do a stand-up interview. Instead, they were separately mic’d and spoke about their work as they walked through the streets of the neighborhood known simply as Downtown. To pay homage to the natural style in which they shoot, this video, too, is completely raw — no color correction, stabilization or lighting adjustments were made to the footage.)

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Kyle ‘Nice Shot’ Pompey, Baltimore Street Photographer

Kyle ‘Nice Shot’ Pompey, Baltimore Street Photographer

60 Photos, 1 Video

Kyle Pompey, known to some as ‘Nice Shot Kyle,’ takes a no-frills approach to his Baltimore street photography; he just shoots what he sees. And sometimes having trouble expressing himself verbally, Pompey has leaned on his images to speak for him.
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David Kraus, Baltimore Street Photographer

David Kraus, Baltimore Street Photographer

138 Photos, 1 Video

Baltimore street photographer and Bel Air native David Kraus has is fascinated by Baltimore architecture and history, particularly the tradition of the arabber street merchants. He says it’s important to document these people, among other things, that offer a connection to Baltimore’s past.
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Jamie Anerobi, Baltimore Street Photographer

Jamie Anerobi, Baltimore Street Photographer

56 Photos, 1 Video

Jamie Anerobi is relatively new to Baltimore, having recently come here from London. He has a degree in psychology, which informs his approach to street photography — that is, to embed himself in the communities that he wants to document so that the images are as authentic as possible. And, he says, the British accent always draws curiosity from subjects — many of whom have never heard it before.
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Maryland Hunt Cup Point-to-Point race, 1941

Maryland Hunt Cup Point-to-Point race, 1941

47 Photos

The Maryland Hunt Cup ran its first point-to-point race in 1894 at Worthington Valley in Baltimore County. It’s considered one of the most challenging steeplechase races in the world. The cup’s 1941 race was photographed by Marion Post Wolcott, a photojournalist who covered Baltimore for the Farm Security Administration in the Great Depression and World War II.

This post is part of The Darkroom’s ongoing look at Baltimore during and shortly after the end of the Great Depression (thanks to Yale’s Photogrammar site). All captions are the original text provided with that image.

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Mike McCoy, Baltimore Street Photographer

Mike McCoy, Baltimore Street Photographer

59 Photos, 1 Video

Baltimore street photographer Mike McCoy is a smooth operator when finding subjects to photograph. His portraits, often in black and white, are a way of documenting city life for future generations, he says. On a recent Friday afternoon, McCoy took a stroll up North Avenue, where it was hard to find a subject who would turn him down.
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Building Liberty ships in Baltimore during World War II era

Building Liberty ships in Baltimore during World War II era

71 Photos

In January 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt created an emergency shipbuilding program, and Baltimore was one of many places that expanded its shipyards for this $350 million project. Construction in Baltimore yielded more of these “Liberty” ships than any other American shipyard, according to a 2001 Sun article. The images in this gallery were taken by photographer Alfred T. Palmer, mostly in 1941.

This post is part of The Darkroom’s ongoing look at Baltimore during and shortly after the end of the Great Depression (thanks to Yale’s Photogrammar site). All captions are the original text provided with that image.

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